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WebDev, UX & a Pinch of Fantasy

19 minutes readtmux

Jaime's Guide to Tmux: The Most Awesome Tool You Didn't know you needed

Become 1 Percent Better Every Week

tmux is one of those things in life that at first encounter sound really weird and confusing. You learn about them and you can’t quite understand what the heck they do, how they can be useful or why anybody would want to use them. BUT it is one of those things that when given a chance, when given some experimentation, courage and perseverance, it turns out that they are awesome, and you can’t quite live without them.

Ok, So What is tmux and Why Should I Care?

Oftentimes in software development you’ll run into the need of having lots of terminals running different tasks: development web servers, editors, git, building, linting, testing, interacting with remote servers, etc… If you haven’t put much thought or energy into optimizing this workflow, you’re likely to use tabs or different terminal windows which you create on demand and arrange every now and then with the help of your mouse. This is typically slow and will require you to redo the whole setup any time you restart your computer. There’s got to be a better way!!. And there is: The tmux way.

Tmux is a tool (a terminal multiplexer if we want to talk with propriety) that helps you level up your terminal wizardry. To put it in a succint way, tmux is the vim of terminal management. It:

  • eases the creation and management of terminal windows and panes with a few keyboard shortcuts
  • lets you setup development environments that you can pause and resume at will
  • is entirely customizable and can be made to work perfectly in tandem with Vim
  • lets you pair program remotely with your colleagues

In this article you’ll learn how to setup and use tmux to improve your development workflow, I’ll guide you step by step, from installing, to configuring and I’ll even show you my favorite features and how I take advantage of tmux in my day to day coding. Let’s get started!

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8 minutes readbooks

My favorite books of 2019

I love reading! I read before going to bed, at the gym, on the commute, on the sofa, in that cozy corner in our home office, at the coffeehouse, on a plane, in the toilet, in the toilet on the plane (no way), on the train, all-the-time. Here are my top picks for 2019.

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2 minutes readsvelte

Learn Svelte

A Banner with the text Discovering Svelte and the Svelte logo

Svelte is a modern web framework that takes a novel approach to building web applications by moving the bulk of its work from runtime to compile-time. Being a compiler-first framework allows Svelte to do some very interesting stuff that is unavailable to other frameworks like disappearing from your application at runtime, or allowing for a component centered development with HTML, JavaScript and CSS coexisting within the same Svelte file in a very web standards friendly fashion.

I’ve been following Svelte’s progress for quite some time and I finally found some time to tinker with it. This is the beginning of a series of posts where you’ll be able to read about my experience and adventures with Svelte starting with a couple of videos and some resources to get you warmed up.

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10 minutes readtypescript

TypeScript Types Deep Dive - Part 2: The Absence of Value

The TypeScript logo followed by the subtitle Types Deep Dive

TypeScript is a modern and safer version of JavaScript that has taken the web development world by storm. It is a superset of JavaScript that adds in some additional features, syntactic sugar and static type analysis aimed at making you more productive and able to scale your JavaScript projects. This is the second part of a series of articles where we explore TypeScript’s comprehensive type system and learn how you can take advantage of it to build very robust and maintainable web apps.

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13 minutes readtypescript

TypeScript Types Deep Dive - Part 1

The TypeScript logo followed by the subtitle Types Deep Dive

TypeScript is a modern and safer version of JavaScript that has taken the web development world by storm. It is a superset of JavaScript that adds in some additional features, syntactic sugar and static type analysis aimed at making you more productive and able to scale your JavaScript projects.

TypeScript was first launched in 2012, and at the time it did bring a lot of new features to JavaScript. Features that wouldn’t be available in JavaScript until much later with ES2015 and beyond. Today however, the gap in features between TypeScript and JavaScript is closing, and what remains as TypeScript strongest value proposition is its amazing type system and the dev tools around it. This type system is the one that delivers on the promise of TypeScript: JavaScript that scales and what brings you a great develop experience with:

  • Instant feedback whenever you do something dumb
  • Powerful statement completion
  • Seamless semantic code navigation
  • Smart refactorings and automatic code fixes
  • And more

In this series of articles we’ll explore TypeScript’s comprehensive type system and learn how you can take advantage of it to build very robust and maintainable web apps.

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