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Exploring Vim

Since I became a programmer I’ve been quite fixated with the idea of making more with less. From how to live a fulfilling, purposeful and thoughtful life to how to refactor this line of code in the most efficient way possible. In the ambit of coding, I’ve been obsessed with learning new skills and tools that can unlock and unleash unlimited power and enable me to achieve more with every keystroke and with every hour I invest into developing something.

Tidy desktop setup with and iMAC that has a wallpaper prompting you to do more

Photo by Carl Heyerdahl on Unsplash

One of such tools is vim. Vim is a text editor whose centric keyboard design, modal philosophy, and command composable nature, promises unlimited productivity and masterful text editing to those who dare confront its steep learning curve and survive to tell the tale.

It’s been 5 years since I decided to bite the bullet and learn to vim. It was tough, particularly because I wasn’t a touch typist, but I managed to learn and glean some of the power promised on the other side. However, I never made a complete jump to vim. Instead, I stayed within the cozier confines of Visual Studio, Atom, and lately Visual Studio Code using a vim layer (most editors have a vim mode that supports vim to a higher or lesser degree). Vim would remain my second editor, mostly used for hobby projects or writing. So I never got to get really good at vim. Don’t get me wrong, learning to be comfortable with the basic commands and motions helped me be more proficient in writing and editing code. Even better, it resulted in a thinner interface between my brain and the keyboard which allows me to put my thoughts into code that much easier.

Nonetheless, I’ve always felt a slight pang of remorse about not going the full way, a nagging feeling that emulated vim within the confines of another editor can’t be as good as the real thing, a feeling that I must be missing out on something.

So here we are! Today, I pledge to re-take my quest of text editing enlightenment, tread the treacherous paths of learning vim and arrive to the holy shrine of coding awesomeness. Care to join?

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Opening The Wikis!!

When you come into my blog and you read an article, then go on and browse the archives or read yet another article you’re just seeing the tip of the iceberg (or perhaps half of the iceberg?). Wait! What!? Is there more??

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commentspersonal

How To Be More Productive And Have a Happier Life In 5 Easy Steps

One great side-effect about being on parental leave is that you have time to think: Why was I such an asshole to my wife this morning? What do I want out of life? Am I ever going to learn to play the violin? Do I get anything positive out of Twitter or Facebook? Who would win at a sword fight, a samurai or a musketeer?

One thing that I’ve been pondering for quite a bit is whether I have a healthy relationship with my phone. I think that by the amount of people of all sizes and conditions that I see with their face inside their phone every day, phone addiction is a common problem that afflicts all of us humans living in this generation. And as much as I like to tell myself that I have my phone use under control while all these other people don’t, the reality is that am I as hooked as everybody else. So more and more often, I have been questioning my relationship with my phone as it resembles a lot a previous addiction I defeated in the past: smoking.

Image of a smartphone with a lock screen wallpaper displaying the message 'Are you sure?'
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commentsgamedev

How to Write a Game in Under 13 Kb While Taking Care of a Baby

Wow! It’s been a while! The past year has been wonderful and tough in equal measure. Having and taking care of a baby as an equal partner is exhilarating, heart-warming and… extremely exhausting, and that’s why you haven’t heard much of me for the past year. Let this article and the js13kgames competition be my comeback.

In the paragraphs below you’ll learn how it feels to develop a game in under 13Kb, how I approached the challenge, from planning, to developing the game mechanics, particle systems, generative algorithms, music, galaxies, fleets of mysterious aliens and how I arrived to something resembling a game: Earth That Was. (enter video)

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